Preventing Session Hijacking


To defend against session hijack attacks, a network should employ several defenses. The most effective protection is encryption, such as Internet Protocol Security (IPSec). This also defends against any other attack vectors that depend on sniffing. Attackers may be able to passively monitor your connection, but they won't be able to interpret the encrypted data. Other countermeasures include using encrypted applications such as Secure Shell (SSH, an encrypted telnet) and Secure Sockets Layer (SSL, for HTTPS traffic).
You can help prevent session hijacking by reducing the potential methods of gaining access to your network—for example, by eliminating remote access to internal systems. If the network has remote users who need to connect to carry out their duties, then use virtual private networks (VPNs) that have been secured with tunneling protocols and encryption (Layer 3 Tunneling Protocol [L3TP]/Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol [PPTP] and IPSec).
The use of multiple safety nets is always the best countermeasure to any potential threat. Employing any one countermeasure may not be enough, but using them together to secure your enterprise will make the attack success rate minimal for anyone but the most professional and dedicated attacker. The following is a checklist of countermeasures that should be employed to prevent session hijacking:
  • Use encryption.
  • Use a secure protocol.
  • Limit incoming connections.
  • Minimize remote access.
  • Have strong authentication.
  • Educate your employees.
  • Maintain different username and passwords for different accounts.
  • Use Ethernet switches rather than hubs to prevent session hijacking attacks.

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